Coney Island Parchute Jump

The Coney Island Parachute Jump was unveiled in July 2006 as a public event and was later the recipient of New York Construction Magazine's "Award of Merit", the New York Landmarks Conservancy's "Lucy G. Moses Preservation Award" and the highest lighting design industry award, The Lumen. The revisualization of the landmark 277-foot structure, widely considered Brooklyn's answer to the "Eiffel Tower", was developed with a consortium of owner/stakeholders including the Borough President and Parks Commissioner.

The Coney Island district is undergoing revitalization efforts, and this project is seen as a symbol and marker of progress. Light Projects' enhancement of the tower evokes the rising and falling of the well-remembered parachutes for which the structure was originally built. Directional lighting offers the viewer vantage points from as close as one hundred feet to as far as a mile away. Lighting systems include color-changing floodlights and custom-designed light emitting diodes (LED). Brightly sparkling LEDs, defining the canopy of the tower and the tower itself, are programmed to animate a calendar of sequences, playing nightly to identify on-and-off boardwalk seasons, full-moon cycles and holidays.

RFnA consulted throughout the process on this project in various ways. RFnA developed the algorithm for the control system to enable the lighting to emulate the calendar sequences. The mounting system for the lighting devices was engineered by RFnA. Final programming of the system and the development of a maintenance program was also provided by RFnA.


Click on image to enlarge +